Pre-formed Panel, Roundtable Presentation, Discussion Session Individual Paper and Individual Discussion Session proposals:

The College Book Art Association invites new and current Regular and Student Members to submit proposals for Collective Relevance: The Reciprocity of Art and Artifact, the 2018 College Book Art Association Conference, Philadelphia, January 4–6, 2018.

Submission Deadline: June 18, 2017


COLLECTIVE RELEVANCE: THE RECIPROCITY OF ART AND ARTIFACT

The diplomat, inventor and printer, Benjamin Franklin [1706–1790], contributed greatly during his lifetime in each of these capacities. The act of providing for the needs of his countrymen was a part of his being. Franklin stated: “As we enjoy great advantages from the inventions of others, we should be glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours, and this we should do freely and generously.” This is illustrated in his 1784 invention of the double spectacles, later to be known as the bifocal lens, which utilizes the principle of refraction to enhance sight. Franklin’s need to clarify what was before him is based on his classification of distance or reading. The nomenclature of seeing elements in an augmented manner, like the enhancing double spectacles, is a rich metaphor for the conference: Collective Relevance: The Reciprocity of Art and Artifact. This single narrative within the complexity of Benjamin Franklin’s life is extracted to deepen the experiences within his historical city of Philadelphia.

The manner of experiencing and interacting amid the vast collections housed within the original Pennsylvania Colony during the conference days are without end: all which is far and near, historical and contemporary, as well as a focal point of research, academic exploration and creative inspiration. All are seen through the distinct pedagogical lens of each participant and all extend beyond the University, into the prominent historical institutions of Philadelphia which provide arenas for research, academic exploration and inspiration—a fluid classroom. The city of Philadelphia, vibrant in history, culture and contemporary art, is a central component and well-acknowledged companion to the MFA program in Book Arts and Printmaking at the University of the Arts.

Moreover, Philadelphia offers a vibrant modern and cultural art landscape from printmaking collectives such as Second State Press and Space 1026; to the artist run Vox Populi; and Fabric Workshop and Museum and The Print Center— the opportunities for exploration and discovery are vast.

The conference allows participants to focus on the heritage and relevance of the city’s renowned collections— which bridge centuries in their significant and celebrated holdings. A single artifact within an institution can foster expansive reasoning for examination and can act as a catalyst for an academic panel. This enables proposals to be constructed beyond the anticipated, embracing the borderless geography of interdisciplinary and critical thought. Panels and/or papers should fall under one of the five categories listed below.


Theme 1: Art and Artifact as a Pedagogical Catalyst

Considerations:

  1. What role has and what role will the discipline of book arts play in the pedagogy of higher education? Will innovation in the placement of artifacts (collections) engage students from within and across disciplines in doing research in the field of book arts?
  2. How can the art school model, as well as programs housed within a liberal arts environment, initiate and integrate on a larger scale the vast collection of artist books into course content? How does one engage students from across disciplines in research of artists’ books or the history of the book?
  3. In what ways are artifacts being taught/utilized in the framework of book arts history and in union with graduate studio practice and undergraduate studio practice? Discuss any collaborative strategies.
  4. What place do educators have to illuminate the physical and tactile importance of artist books/collections in a digital society? Are there new initiatives for interdisciplinary teaching?


Theme 2: The Stewardship of History
Considerations:

  1. In the geographical relevancy of the conference and its connection to the making of history as well as its preservation, how can historical and contemporary artifacts of the book arts discipline be acknowledged and preserved? How does one sustain their life and use?
  2. How can makers and institutions further the cause of preservation equally in private and public collections and with diverse acquisition voices? How does one sustain the longevity of their collection?
  3. What role does the Association serve in establishing the principles of stewardship within their own discipline?
  4. In what manner does book arts serve in engaging local academic communities and the public-at-large to its artifacts?


Theme 3: The Artist Book Manifesto
Considerations:

  1. Philadelphia is associated as a city to the greater county as a place where identity was formed in the penning of documents of vision. What is the visual voice of the discipline in the 21st century?
  2. Is there a call to action, in the spirit of preceding manifestos of artists’, to engage current and new makers?
  3.  Drawing upon the history of the city’s Independence Hall, how can language be utilized with resolve and eloquence to illuminate the present and future tenants of the field? Can the metaphor of the double spectacle allow for expanded considerations?


Theme 4: Curatorial Visions and Aesthetics
Considerations:

  1. What are the parameters for establishing a collection in relation to current higher education pedagogy and institutional holdings and in mounting exhibitions of relevancy? How does one begin to form a vision or aesthetic for their collection and how does that define or create parameters for what acquisitions are made?
  2. In what ways do curators/special collections librarians craft the visual voice of their institution through collaboration of artist and artifact in both acquisitions and exhibitions? What is the nomenclature of a collection? How can this be utilized to bring critical insight into all elements of contemporary artist books?
  3. In what manners do the pedagogy of studio practice, critical theory and research enable educators to engage students to experience and contextualize their work through a curatorial lens? What curatorial skills are required for such?
  4. What role does a digital society have in the reciprocity of current and future environments of art and artifact within the book arts discipline?


Theme 5: Reciprocation: On Education and Preservation

Considerations:

  1. Educating curators and young book artists- how does one articulate or cultivate an individual curatorial or artistic skill set? How should education broaden and expand for special collections librarians, curators, directors, and faculty?
  2.  Crafting professional trajectories within the field to ensure its continuity: how does one build a knowledge base of practitioners in the field and create sustainable relationships among artists, designers, collectors, dealers, writers, publishers, nonprofits?
  3. Developing faculties: Identifying and collaborating with one's constituents to expand research, teaching, opportunities
  4. The importance of Public and private collections: recognizing potential for cooperation and support 


SUBMISSION GUIDELINES
Complete requirements and details are found on the Submittable pages linked below.


Pre-formed Panel Proposal
A pre-formed panel consists of three thematically-related presentations of 20 minutes each, and includes 30 minutes for questions and audience discussion. The total session is 90 minutes. Your submission should include an abstract for the panel topic and synopses for each presenter’s topic (see below). Organizers will only assign an outside moderator to introduce the group.

https://cbaa.submittable.com/submit/f92ba1b0-5b55-47d4-8368-1c1df482545b/philadelphia-2018-conference-proposals-pre-formed-panel-roundtable-presentati

 

Roundtable Presentation Proposal
A roundtable presentation consists of three or four speakers who arrange to have a discussion among themselves on a particular topic. Altogether, the session will be 90 minutes, including approximately 20 minutes at the end for audience questions and participation. It is more informal than a pre-formed panel, but each speaker should have a synopsis outlining what they intend to discuss on the roundtable topic (see below). For this category, one of the roundtable participants may lead the discussion. Organizers will only assign an outside moderator to introduce the group.

https://cbaa.submittable.com/submit/77635/philadelphia-2018-conference-proposals-pre-formed-panel-roundtable-presentati


Group Discussion Session Proposal
A group discussion session consists of three to four presenters, plus audience participation. Altogether, the session will be 90 minutes. It is the most informal and free-form, but each presenter should have a synopsis outlining what they intend to discuss on the topic and how they intend to lead that discussion. For this category, discussion session presenters may lead the discussion. Organizers will only assign an outside moderator to introduce the group.

https://cbaa.submittable.com/submit/77635/philadelphia-2018-conference-proposals-pre-formed-panel-roundtable-presentati


Individual Paper Proposal
An individual paper consists of one presentation of 20 minutes. Multiple presenters will be grouped together, and the total session will be 90 minutes. This amount of time includes 30 minutes for questions and audience discussion with all of the session presenters. Your submission should include an abstract/synopsis for the presentation topic. Conference organizers will assign an outside moderator to introduce the group, keep time and moderate discussion.

https://cbaa.submittable.com/submit/82495/philadelphia-2018-conference-proposals-individual-paper-or-individual-discuss


Individual Discussion Session Proposal
An individual discussion session consists of one presenter, plus audience participation. Multiple presenters will be grouped together, and the total session will be 90 minutes. It is the most informal and free-form of the categories, but the presenter should have a synopsis outlining what they intend to discuss on the topic and how they intend to lead that discussion. Conference organizers will assign an outside moderator to introduce the group and keep time.

https://cbaa.submittable.com/submit/f07b5524-af72-4866-876d-5e2c2489cd20/philadelphia-2018-conference-proposals-individual-paper-or-individual-discuss


Please note that the only way to submit proposals is through the online submission manager.

Submissions are accepted using a blind jurying process, so title, abstract, and synopsis must not include names, press names or other similar identifiable information.

Regular members may submit once to the pre-formed panel/roundtable presentation/group discussion session or individual paper/individual discussion session categories. However, if more than one is selected, only one will be chosen for presentation (in this order: pre-formed panel, roundtable presentation, individual paper, group discussion session, individual discussion session).

Student Members may submit once to the pre-formed panel/roundtable presentation/group discussion session or individual paper/individual discussion session or student lightning round categories. However, if more than one is selected, only one will be chosen for presentation (in this order: pre-formed panel, roundtable presentation, individual paper, group discussion session, individual discussion session, student lightning round).

Submission applications have been divided in two separate categories on Submittable. When you are ready to apply, link to the correct category by clicking below:


SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS: ALL SUBMISSIONS
Only current CBAA members (individual, student, and institutional members) are eligible to submit. Every presenter and participant in the pre-formed panel, roundtable presentation, group discussion session must be a CBAA member in order for the submission to be eligible. To become a new member, or to renew your membership, please click here. If you submit but other participants are not members, your submission will be withdrawn and not considered.


Pre-Formed Panel, Roundtable Presentation, Group Discussion Session Specific Submission Requirements
You will be asked to submit the following information when prompted by the online submission manager for each entry separately:

  • Name, address, phone number, email address, job/position title, institution, institution location and 50-word bio for Submitting Member #1
  • Name, email, job title, institution, institution location and 50-word bio for Member #2
  • Name, email, job title, institution, institution location and 50-word bio for Member #3
  • Name, email, job title, institution, institution location and 50-word bio for Member #4 (optional member for roundtable presentations or discussion sessions)

The following content must NOT include names, press names or other similar identifiable information:

  • Title of proposed panel/roundtable/discussion
  • 250-word abstract for panel/roundtable/discussion topic
  • 50-word synopsis of contribution from member #1
  • 50-word synopsis of contribution from member #2
  • 50-word synopsis of contribution from member #3
  • 50-word synopsis of contribution from member #4 (optional fourth member for roundtable presentations or discussion sessions)


Please note that the 50-word synopsis and bio may be printed in the conference program or put on the conference website. We may lightly edit your bio and synopsis for style and consistency.


Individual Paper, Individual Discussion Session Specific Submission Requirements
You will be asked to submit the following information when prompted by the online submission manager for each entry separately:

  • Name, address, phone number, email address, job/position title, institution, institution location and 50-word bio for Submitting Member

The following content must NOT include names, press names or other similar identifiable information:

  • Title of proposed paper/individual discussion
  • 250-word abstract for paper/individual discussion topic
  • 50-word synopsis of contribution from submitting member


Please note that the 50-word synopsis and bio may be printed in the conference program or put on the conference website. We may lightly edit your bio and synopsis for style and consistency.


DEADLINES: ALL SUBMISSIONS
Proposals must be received no later than the deadline listed below. Submissions received after this date will not be considered for acceptance.

June 18, 2017: Deadline for submission of proposals
August 6, 2017: Notification of acceptance or rejection of proposals
August 13, 2017: Deadline for confirmation of acceptance by presenters



CONTACT: ALL SUBMISSIONS
For content-related questions about proposals for pre-formed panels, roundtable presentations, group discussion sessions, individual papers, individual group discussions, student lightning talks, or for questions about the submission process in any category: conference1@collegebookart.org.

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